Covid-19 : Comprehensive Awareness and Action

Leading the Charge Against COVID-19 in SouthEast San Diego & Beyond

In SouthEast San Diego, the COVID-19 pandemic has amplified health disparities amongst communities of color. At JIREH Providers, we are taking decisive action to address these challenges and ensure that everyone in our community has access to the resources they need & deserve to protect themselves.

COVID-19 Resources

Find a testing site near you

TESTING

Get treatment for COVID-19

COVID-19

Get your next vaccine dose

VACCINE

Stay Healthy.

As the COVID-19 cases are beginning to surge again in certain areas, it is important that you have as many resources as possible to keep you and your loved ones healthy. Whether you are having symptoms and need to test, have tested positive and need treatment, or are ready for your next booster shot, JIREH Providers is here to support you. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to us!

JIREH Providers is dedicated to working with patients in Southeast San Diego and surrounding communities, to help stop the spread of COVID-19 in our communities, by providing access to care.

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COVID FAQs

The FDA has extended the expiration date for most At-Home (Over-the-Counter) tests. Click here to find FDA test extensions.
Three-month extensions have been given for iHealth OTC tests, issued March 29, 2022. (https://ihealthlabs.com/pages/news). This website has a tool to enter the test lot numbers to look up the new expiration dates.
Four-month extensions have been given for FlowFlex OTC tests, etc.

There are two primary types of COVID-19 tests that have been approved by the FDA. They are detailed below:

Viral Tests:
Viral tests are used to determine whether or not you have been infected by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. These tests detect infections present at the time of the test.

– PCR Tests: PCR (polymerase chain reaction) tests are commonly analyzed in a laboratory and indicate the presence of the COVID-19 virus’ RNA. PCR tests are generally more accurate than rapid antigen tests, but may take several days to process. A PCR test is commonly performed via a swab of the nose or throat. Some tests may also use a fluid sample (via saliva collected in a vial), which is then analyzed by the testing site.

Antigen Test: Antigen tests detect proteins (antigens) of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. A rapid antigen test is very accurate, but slightly less accurate than a PCR test. Antigen tests are performed via a nasal swab. The FDA has approved the emergency-use authorization of at-home antigen tests, which means these rapid tests are available for personal use without the requirement of driving to a testing site.

Antibody Tests:
Antibody tests detect the presence of antibodies (the proteins that combat infection) in the blood. Antibody tests will not diagnose a current infection, rather they are used to determine whether or not an individual has been previously infected by the COVID-19 virus. According to the CDC, antibody tests are not recommended for individuals dealing with a current infection, or individuals who have immunity to COVID-19 after receiving a full vaccination series against the virus. Antibody tests are performed via a blood sample (usually a finger prick or blood drawn from the arm).19).

If you have symptoms

If you are feeling symptoms of COVID, you should get tested immediately regardless of vaccination status.


If you were exposed

If you are vaccinated, get tested within 5-7 days of exposure. If you are unvaccinated, get tested immediately and then again 5-7 days later.


Best practices for testing and self-isolation are still evolving. For the most up-to-date information on COVID testing and guidelines, please talk to your doctor and check the CDC’s testing guidelines and self-isolation guidelines to stay up-to-date.

People with COVID experience a range of symptoms, including:
  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
This is not a complete list of symptoms. Refer to your doctor and the CDC or local health authority for a complete list.
If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID or if you have been exposed, you should get tested regardless of vaccination status. If you are unvaccinated, the CDC recommends getting tested immediately and then again in 5-7 days. Vaccinated people should get tested 5-7 days after exposure. There are two kinds of tests available today: viral PCR and viral rapid tests. Free COVID testing is generally available nationwide through a mix of local testing sites, at doctor offices, and at neighborhood stores like CVS, Walgreens, and more. Check your local health website for resources to find the nearest test. While antibody tests are used to detect the presence of COVID antibodies, it is not recommended to use this test to determine an active infection. For the latest on testing, refer to the CDC testing guidelines. To get screened for COVID and talk to a doctor about concerns, symptoms, and more, book a COVID screening today.

There are two primary types of COVID-19 tests that have been approved by the FDA. They are detailed below:

Viral Tests:
Viral tests are used to determine whether or not you have been infected by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. These tests detect infections present at the time of the test.

– PCR Tests: PCR (polymerase chain reaction) tests are commonly analyzed in a laboratory and indicate the presence of the COVID-19 virus’ RNA. PCR tests are generally more accurate than rapid antigen tests, but may take several days to process. A PCR test is commonly performed via a swab of the nose or throat. Some tests may also use a fluid sample (via saliva collected in a vial), which is then analyzed by the testing site.

Antigen Test: Antigen tests detect proteins (antigens) of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. A rapid antigen test is very accurate, but slightly less accurate than a PCR test. Antigen tests are performed via a nasal swab. The FDA has approved the emergency-use authorization of at-home antigen tests, which means these rapid tests are available for personal use without the requirement of driving to a testing site.

Antibody Tests:
Antibody tests detect the presence of antibodies (the proteins that combat infection) in the blood. Antibody tests will not diagnose a current infection, rather they are used to determine whether or not an individual has been previously infected by the COVID-19 virus. According to the CDC, antibody tests are not recommended for individuals dealing with a current infection, or individuals who have immunity to COVID-19 after receiving a full vaccination series against the virus. Antibody tests are performed via a blood sample (usually a finger prick or blood drawn from the arm).19).

PCR (polymerase chain reaction) tests are used to detect the genetic material of a virus or other pathogen (organisms that cause disease). PCR testing is used to detect the presence of several different viruses but is presently known as a highly accurate method of diagnosing an active infection caused by the COVID-19 virus (also known as coronavirus 2019).

Both PCR and antigen tests have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and endorsed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as effective and accurate COVID-19 testing methods. Unlike antibody tests, which detect the presence of antibodies in the blood that act as evidence of a previous infection, these diagnostic tests can detect current infections caused by the COVID-19 virus.

Antibody testing checks for antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19. When someone gets COVID-19, their body usually makes antibodies. However, it typically takes one to three weeks to develop these antibodies. Some people may take even longer to develop antibodies, and some people may not develop antibodies. A positive result from this test may mean that person was previously infected with the virus. Talk to your doctor about whether an antibody test is right for you.

Antibody tests should not be used to confirm a COVID-19 diagnosis. To see if you are currently infected, you need a viral test. Viral tests identify the virus in respiratory samples, such as swabs from the inside of your nose.

We do not know yet if having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 can protect someone from getting infected again or, if they do, how long this protection might last. Scientists are conducting research to answer those questions.

For the latest on antibody testing, refer to the CDC guidelines.

Get tested
If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID, you should get tested immediately, regardless of vaccination status.

Stay home except to get medical care
After a positive diagnosis, you should self-isolate and not leave home until 10 days following your first symptoms or positive test. On December 27, 2021, the CDC changed its self-isolation recommendation, shortening it from 10 days to 5 days, if asymptomatic, followed by 5 days of wearing a mask around others. Always refer to your local health guidelines and your doctor’s recommendation.

Monitor your symptoms
While you are sick, monitor your symptoms including your fever, cough, and more. If your symptoms persist or worsen, contact a doctor. Your doctor or local health authority may provide recommendations on checking your symptoms and reporting information.

When to seek emergency care
According to the CDC, continue to monitor for emergency warning signs of COVID, including:
– Difficulty breathing
– Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
– Confusion
– Inability to wake or stay awake
– Pale, gray, or blue-colored skin, lips, or nail beds, depending on skin tone.


*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

If you are looking for more resources and information regarding COVID-19 testing, we recommend referring to the CDC’s COVID-19 test page here. Antibody tests are used to detect the presence of COVID antibodies, it is not recommended to use this test to determine an active infection.


For the latest on testing, refer to the CDC testing guidelines.

The Challenge

Communities of color have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. According to recent 2023 data in California, the death rate for Black people is 19% higher than the rate for all Californians (nationally 3x higher for Black & Latino Americans), the death rate for Latino people is 8% higher than the rate for all Californians, and the case rate for Pacific Islander people is 82% higher than the rate for all Californians. Additionally, the case rate for communities with median income <$40K is 14% higher than the rate for all Californians. National data shows that Black and Latino individuals have a COVID-19 death rate of almost 3 times that of white individuals. These disparities are due in large part to systemic issues, related to lack of access to healthcare and vaccination sites, misinformation, healthcare bias, and justified distrust in the healthcare system.  

Our Response

At JIREH Providers, we are leveraging our role as a mobile community clinic to provide wraparound care &  bring essential  COVID-19 services directly to the community. We provide health education, vaccination, testing, and treatment, ensuring that every individual in our service area has access to the care they need. Our team is committed to fighting misinformation and building a system & healthcare providers we can trust.

Our Impact

Our efforts are making a difference. Throughout the pandemic our team vaccinated over 50k community members. By reaching individuals directly in their communities, we are working to close the vaccination gap and reduce the impact of COVID-19 on our community. As active members of the San Diego County Equity Task Force and the Vaccine Clinical Advisory Board, we leverage our voices to influence policy and practice, helping to shape a more equitable response to COVID-19 in San Diego County.

How You Can Help

Your support is crucial in this fight. By sharing accurate information, getting vaccinated, testing when exposed or symptomatic, and supporting our efforts through volunteering or donating, you can help us protect our community and turn the tide against this virus.